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HarborView Senior Assisted Living https://harborviewsandiego.com HarborView Senior Assisted Living Mon, 28 Jun 2021 20:33:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 115915067 The Diet that May Cut the Risk of Alzheimer’s by 53% https://harborviewsandiego.com/the-diet-that-may-cut-the-risk-of-alzheimers-by-53/ https://harborviewsandiego.com/the-diet-that-may-cut-the-risk-of-alzheimers-by-53/#respond Mon, 28 Jun 2021 20:33:42 +0000 http://harborviewsandiego.com/?p=3626 Subjects who adhered to the MIND diet the most closely had a 53% lower risk of Alzheimer’s. Evidence-based care is a huge priority for us at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living in San Diego.

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Though research on the MIND diet is still in its beginning stages, observational studies are very promising! Scientists are finding that the diet may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and slow the cognitive decline that often happens as people age. 

The MIND diet, an abbreviation for Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay, focuses on plant-based foods and a lowered consumption of saturated fats, red meat, and sweets.

Continued below is a breakdown of the diet as well as sample meals for three days! 

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Senior Care in San Diego 

Thanks for joining us for our series on dementia and Alzheimer’s research. Perhaps you or a loved one was recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. Or maybe you are just wanting to do everything you can to preventatively boost your brain health. If you’re interested in exploring Alzheimer’s and dementia research, this series is for you! 

Evidence-based care is a huge priority for us at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living in downtown San Diego (as well as at our sister sites, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living and Bay View Assisted Living) and we hope you will appreciate diving into the research with us! 

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Observational Studies on the MIND Diet 

To date, there have been two large-scale, observational studies of the MIND diet. Though these studies can’t be used to prove cause and effect, the results can provide researchers with valuable health information that can then be further studied. 

In researching 923 older adults, subjects who adhered to the MIND diet the most closely had a 53% lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease than people who stuck to the diet the least.  

Those who followed the MIND diet only moderately still seemed to experience significant benefits. Individuals that loosely adhered to the diet, reduced their risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease by an average of 35%!

How does it work? Scientists hypothesize that the diet’s ability to reduce inflammation, oxidative stress, and harmful beta-amyloid proteins is the reason for its success in boosting cognitive health. 

5 Food to Avoid, 10 to Focus On

To simplify the MIND diet, here are the 5 foods or food groups that should be avoided, and the 10 food or food groups to include. Find out more in our next installment! 

AVOID

  • Butter or margarine
  • Cheese
  • Red Meat
  • Fried Foods
  • Pastries and Sweets

FOCUS ON

  • Green, leafy vegetables
  • All other vegetables
  • Berries
  • Nuts
  • Olive oil
  • Whole Grains
  • Fish
  • Beans
  • Poultry
  • Wine

Sample 3 Day Meal Plan

The greatest obstacle to making healthy changes to diet and lifestyle can be the feeling of being overwhelmed. Rather than trying to make massive changes all at once, research shows that small, incremental changes over time lead to long-lasting health impacts. Outlined below are three sample days of eating according to the MIND. 

Friday

  • Breakfast: Wheat toast with avocado, omelet with peppers and onions.
  • Lunch: Chili made with ground turkey.
  • Dinner: Greek-seasoned baked chicken, oven-roasted potatoes, side salad, wheat dinner roll.

Saturday

  • Breakfast: Overnight oats with strawberries.
  • Lunch: Fish tacos on whole wheat tortillas, brown rice, pinto beans.
  • Dinner: Chicken gyro on whole-wheat pita, cucumber and tomato salad.

Sunday

  • Breakfast: Spinach frittata, sliced apple and peanut butter.
  • Lunch: Tuna salad sandwich on wheat bread, plus carrots and celery with hummus.
  • Dinner: Curry chicken, brown rice, lentils.

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Best Senior Assisted Living Community in San Diego 

We are committed to evidence-based care at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living (as well as at our sister sites, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living in La Mesa and Bay View Assisted Living in Point Loma) and being familiar with relevant research is an important part of the care we provide. 

We pride ourselves on preparing meals that are good for our residents’ bodies and minds. We frequently update our meal plans and can accommodate specific diet needs and preferences. To find out what meals set us apart give us a call and schedule a COVID safe tour of our one-of-a-kind assisted living home in San Diego!

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Brain-Boosting Foods! https://harborviewsandiego.com/brain-boosting-foods/ https://harborviewsandiego.com/brain-boosting-foods/#respond Mon, 24 May 2021 21:53:00 +0000 http://harborviewsandiego.com/?p=3607 We know there are so many factors in our health that we can’t control. At the same time, we know diet plays a huge role in the health of our bodies and brains. There are many healthy, brain-enhancing foods to […]

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We know there are so many factors in our health that we can’t control. At the same time, we know diet plays a huge role in the health of our bodies and brains. There are many healthy, brain-enhancing foods to consume to help reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. 

Research also points to certain foods that might increase the risk of inflammation in the body and brain. Rather than focusing on a one-time, major overhaul of your diet, try to incorporate one or two of these healthy, mind regenerating foods per month. Read more below about what foods to prioritize!

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Thanks for joining us for our series on dementia and Alzheimer’s research. Perhaps you or a loved one was recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. Or maybe you are just wanting to do everything you can to preventatively boost your brain health. If you’re interested in exploring Alzheimer’s and dementia research, this series is for you! 

Evidence-based care is a huge priority for us at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living in downtown San Diego (as well as at our sister sites, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living and Bay View Assisted Living) and we hope you will appreciate diving into the research with us! 

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Some research suggests that a diet called the MIND diet, an abbreviation for Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay, may cut the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease by up to 53%. Studies also indicate that this diet might boost verbal memory and slow the rate of cognitive decline in older adults. The diet focuses on plant-based foods and reduces the consumption of saturated fats, sweets, and red meat. Interestingly, research shows that you don’t have to follow the MIND diet perfectly to benefit from it. 

Tune in for the next installment of our Alzheimer’s research series to see a full breakdown of the MIND diet as well as a list of foods to avoid if you’re prioritizing your brain’s health! 

In the meantime, here are some foods hypothesized to reduce inflammation in the brain, thereby reducing the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. 

  1. Leafy green vegetables like kale, lettuce, and spinach: Quick tip – pinch the base of the stalk and firmly slide your fingers up it to quickly and easily remove kale leaves from the stalk. 
  2. Salmon and other wild-caught fish (and fish oils): Make sure to order high-quality fish oil supplements as many are already rancid by the time they actually make it to the consumer. 
  3. Coffee
  4. Olive oil
  5. Cold-pressed virgin coconut oil: Some people don’t like the taste of coconut oil, especially for cooking or roasting vegetables. It can be a great alternative to butter in baked goods, however, as the taste isn’t usually as strong when it’s used in this way. 
  6. Berries
  7. Lentils
  8. Beets
  9. Cauliflower: Roast cauliflower at 400 degrees F for 35 minutes with a generous helping of olive oil, salt, and pepper for a delicious side! 
  10. Walnuts
  11. Lamb

Take a look at this article to read more about some simple tweaks to your diet that can make a big difference!

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We are committed to evidence-based care at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living (as well as at our sister sites, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living in La Mesa and Bay View Assisted Living in Point Loma) and being familiar with relevant research is an important part of the care we provide. 

We pride ourselves on preparing meals that are good for our residents’ bodies and minds. We frequently update our meal plans and can accommodate specific diet needs and preferences. To find out what meals set us apart give us a call and schedule a COVID safe tour of our one-of-a-kind assisted living home in San Diego!

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How to Choose Windows for an Assisted Living Community Remodel https://harborviewsandiego.com/how-to-choose-windows-for-an-assisted-living-community-remodel/ https://harborviewsandiego.com/how-to-choose-windows-for-an-assisted-living-community-remodel/#respond Thu, 13 May 2021 21:30:14 +0000 http://harborviewsandiego.com/?p=3597 Remodeling an assisted living property? Or just replacing windows in your own home? Here's all you need to know about selecting windows that are functional, stylish, and affordable.

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Remodeling an Assisted Living Community?

Thanks for joining in on our next installment of super helpful and incredibly practical design tips! Today we’re going to talk about how to pick windows that are timeless, durable, and stylish. Since windows are one of those things that are hardly ever replaced, it’s important to think carefully through your choices as they will most likely be in the space for a long time. 

When would you need to replace windows?

You might need to replace windows if you’re doing an extensive remodel on an assisted living community or if there is damage to existing windows. For example, if your elder care community is in San Diego, right on the coast, there might be salt water damage to the exterior wood window trim if it’s an older property. Alternatively, if you’re designing a new build for a senior living center, you’ll also be a part of the window selection process. 

Renovating an elder care property in San Diego

Anyone who has been through a remodel or renovation knows how exhausting, exciting and overwhelming it can be! While it’s a joy and privilege to have updated spaces, the decision fatigue alone can be daunting. At Bay View Assisted Living in San Diego, California (as well as at our partner locations Mesa View Senior Assisted Living and Harbor View Senior Assisted Living), we’ve worked hard to create inviting spaces for the members of our communities. Follow these tips if you want to do the same in your elder care community!

TIPS FOR SELECTING WINDOWS

When selecting windows, you need to think about the same factors as you would any other design project: the composition, style, finish, function, and shape. 

  • You’ll need to decide if you want open windows or grid windows. Grid windows have divisions on the pane. As a historical consideration, windows with grids were more traditional until the 1950s. 
  • Window finishes are typically fiberglass, vinyl, aluminum, or wood. Wood, of course, tends to be the most attractive, but also has the highest price point. Fiberglass is a great option as it’s much stronger than vinyl and three times stronger than aluminum. It’s repairable, paintable and has great temperature control. 
  • When considering the function of your new windows, you’re essentially asking how the windows are going to open and close. While there are a variety of ways a window can function, the most common are horizontal slider and single hung. Single hung windows open from just the bottom, while double hung windows open from the top and the bottom. 
  • You can feel free to mix different types of windows as long as they are the same style and finish. 

Scenic senior assisted living community in San Diego

Did you know HarborView Senior Assisted Living in San Diego is a charming, old world, historic property that’s been renovated? Find more about the floor plans of HarborView’s rooms here.  When the historic property was renovated, the HarborView team aimed to preserve the rich history and elegance of the home. They simultaneously improved the layout and functionality, designing with elderly residents in mind. 

Design matters! 

At Bay View Assisted Living (and at our sister locations, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living and Harbor View Senior Assisted Living) we care about the physical environment that surrounds the members of our elder care communities. Research shows that aesthetics have a genuine impact on joy (check out the book Joyful: The Surprising Power of Ordinary Things to Create Extraordinary Happiness by Ingrid Fetell Lee to learn more about this). We work hard to maintain beautiful and calming spaces for our residents.

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The Correlation Between Alzheimer’s and Sleep https://harborviewsandiego.com/san-diego-alzheimers-research-sleep/ https://harborviewsandiego.com/san-diego-alzheimers-research-sleep/#respond Mon, 10 May 2021 21:42:41 +0000 http://harborviewsandiego.com/?p=3589 While sleep and dementia is a complicated topic, certain research has found a correlation between poor sleep and Alzheimer’s disease.

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While sleep and dementia is a complicated topic, certain research has found a correlation between poor sleep and Alzheimer’s disease. A bad night’s sleep may increase the level of a protein in your brain that has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease. Research indicates that chronic poor sleep in middle age may increase the risk of Alzheimer’s in later life. We don’t have to live in fear of memory loss or dementia, but we should be smart about the decisions we make. Take a look at this article for 5 helpful tips on getting a better night’s sleep! Read on to learn more about the relationship between dementia and sleep. 

ALZHEIMER’S AND DEMENTIA RESEARCH SERIES IN SAN DIEGO 

Thanks for joining us for our series on dementia and Alzheimer’s research! If you or a loved one was recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, dementia, or Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), you are probably experiencing a wide range of emotions. This is very normal and coming to a place of acceptance with a memory related diagnosis is always a difficult journey. Further along in the journey you might find yourself wanting to look into studies and relevant research to better understand this family of diseases. Evidence-based care is a huge priority for us at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living (as well as at our sister sites, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living and Bay View Assisted Living) and we hope you will appreciate diving into the research with us! 

SLEEP AND DEMENTIA RISK

  • Light Sleep Disorders: Different types of sleep disorders seem to have a connection with certain diseases of the brain. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD), often called light sleep disorders, can be characterized by people talking or acting out what is happening in their dreams. Lewy Body Dementia and Parkinson’s disease seem to be associated with light sleep disorders. Some research indicates that the part of the brain affected by these two diseases play a role in light sleep disorders.
  • Sleep-Wake Cycle Disorders: When the 24 hour sleep cycle (active during the day and sleepy at night) is disrupted it can cause many unusual sleep patterns. These might include napping during the day, having difficulty falling or staying asleep, and being awake during the night. Increased levels of a protein called amyloid are often detected in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s. Research also shows that increased amyloid levels may be connected to sub-standard sleep. 

Poor sleep might affect the body’s natural process of eliminating amyloid from the brain. Additionally, increased levels of this protein might be linked to a decreased ability to store memories. Researchers infer that improving sleep might delay the onset or progression of Alzheimer’s. Alternatively, some research indicates changing sleep patterns are caused by other alterations in the brain and do not increase Alzheimer’s risk. More research is needed before definitive conclusions can be made. 

  • Sleep Disordered Breathing: Sleep Disordered Breathing, also known as sleep apnea, is when a person finds it challenging to breathe while they are asleep. Again, the reasons for this are multifactorial. It is most commonly found in older adults with obesity, though it can impact people of all ages. Sleep disordered breathing may cause damage to the brain because of oxygen deprivation or changes of blood flow to the brain. Some research points to a correlation between sleep apnea and cognitive decline. 

EVIDENCE-BASED MEMORY CARE IN SAN DIEGO 

We are committed to evidence-based care at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living (as well as at our sister sites, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living and Bay View Assisted Living) and being familiar with relevant research is an important part of the care we provide. 

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The Connection Between Alzheimer’s and Cannabis https://harborviewsandiego.com/cannabis-and-alzheimers/ https://harborviewsandiego.com/cannabis-and-alzheimers/#respond Mon, 29 Mar 2021 19:58:08 +0000 http://harborviewsandiego.com/?p=3565 Ever wondered about the connection between marijuana use and Alzheimer's disease? You're not alone. Find out more about the latest research here.

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Thanks for joining us for our series on dementia and Alzheimer’s research! If you or a loved one was recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, dementia, or Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), you are probably experiencing a wide range of emotions. This is very normal and coming to a place of acceptance with a memory related diagnosis is always a difficult journey. Further along in the journey you might find yourself wanting to look into studies and relevant research to better understand this family of diseases. Evidence-based care is a huge priority for us at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living (as well as at our sister sites, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living and Bay View Assisted Living) and we hope you will appreciate diving into the research with us! 

Research on cannabis for medicinal use has exploded in the last few years. Cannabis is being tested for treating everything from cancer to Crohn’s disease. I, like many of you, have friends who suffer from both of these things and so my interest in the medicinal use of cannabis has grown in the last few years especially. I also use THC to help with the occasional bouts of insomnia. A friend asked me just the other day, “Is there any connection between cannabis and Alzheimer’s? I heard that there might be!” Maybe, like my friend, you have wondered the same thing. Let’s dive into the research exploring the connections between cannabis and Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. 

If you live in San Diego, you’ve no doubt seen all of the cannabis stores that have popped up in the last few years as marijuana has been legalized in California. Do you have a friend whose doctor recommended cannabis for relief from the side effects of chemo? Or perhaps you yourself have used cannabis medicinally at some point. Most of us are curious about the side effects of this substance that is becoming more and more commonly used, especially in California. While we know there are many positive uses for cannabis, it is obviously also something that can be abused. It’s important to be aware of any possible negative side effects while still taking advantage of all that cannabis has to offer medicinally.

In short, the scientific literature on marijuana and Alzheimer’s is not clear cut. More research is certainly needed for healthcare providers to be able to make clear recommendations and for dementia patients to make informed choices.  

One large study utilizing SPECT (a controversial brain imaging technology) discovered that marijuana reduced blood flow to the brain. Researchers then inferred this could accelerate the aging process of the brain. Interestingly, neuroimaging technologies like SPECT are not recommended within practice guidelines by the American Psychiatric Association for diagnosing any primary psychiatric disorder. This fact has led many researchers to question the validity of this large study. 

The University of California, Irvine created a center for the study of cannabis. The center analyzed nine peer-reviewed studies focused on the effects of cannabinoids on Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. All of these studies were published by August 2019, so this research is definitely up to date. The review of the nine studies discovered that the CBD components of cannabis might be useful to treat and prevent Alzheimer’s disease. Additionally, some findings implied that using both THC and CBD could be more useful than using CBD or THC alone.

We are committed to evidence-based care at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living (as well as at our sister sites, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living and Bay View Assisted Living) and being familiar with relevant research is an important part of the care we provide. 

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Part IV: Alzheimer’s and Dementia Research https://harborviewsandiego.com/alzheimers-research/ https://harborviewsandiego.com/alzheimers-research/#respond Wed, 17 Feb 2021 22:57:41 +0000 http://harborviewsandiego.com/?p=3539 Evidence-based care is a huge priority for us at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living (as well as at our sister sites, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living and Bay View Assisted Living) and we hope you will appreciate diving into the research with us!

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Thanks for joining us for Part IV of our series on dementia and Alzheimer’s research! If you or a loved one was recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, dementia, or Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), you are probably experiencing a wide range of emotions. This is very normal and coming to a place of acceptance with a memory related diagnosis is always a difficult journey. Further along in the journey you might find yourself wanting to look into studies and relevant research to better understand this family of diseases. In this series, we will review some of the milestone studies related to Alzheimer’s disease, discuss types of research methods, discuss elements of research, and look into the application of methods to quantitative approaches. We will also explore how to evaluate research and identify the signs of a high quality study. Evidence-based care is a huge priority for us at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living (as well as at our sister sites, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living and Bay View Assisted Living) and we hope you will appreciate diving into the research with us! 

In Part IV of this series on dementia and Alzheimer’s research, we will continue to explore the application of methods to quantitative and qualitative approaches. We will also explore aspects of data analysis and begin to touch on the process of evaluating literature.

Within the quantitative approach, there are two types of epidemiological studies that look at the connection between risk factors and a particular disease or health condition. These types of studies are cohort studies and case control studies. For example, investigators might be curious to explore the connection between sleep and Alzheimer’s or dementia. The relationship between these two variables could be explored by case control studies or cohort studies. A case control study might evaluate the life experiences of subjects with dementia compared with the life experiences or life events of a control group whose members do not have dementia. A cohort study would be similar except that it is usually following up on subjects who were in contact with or not in contact with a particular risk factor that is hypothesized to be connected to a particular health problem. 

Reliability can be described as the consistency and precision of the data collection method. Validity refers to the accuracy and reality of the data. Both of these factors are extremely important in determining if research is high-quality or not. For example, if residents of an elder care community are filling out self report questionnaires however half of them do not understand the majority of the words in the questionnaire, this would bring into question both the reliability and validity of the study. It is vital that all results be reported. For example, if there is a randomized controlled trial of a particular Alzheimer‘s medication, all the results (even if some of the results indicated that the medication was not effective) must be reported for that study to be valid and reliable.

Qualitative approaches come up with data that is descriptive and include much more hypothesis and word for word accounts of participant interviews to support the researchers’ conclusions of the data. In quantitative studies on the other hand, the data is put into numerical terms in order to be analyzed. The results are shown in graphs and tables. Whether one is looking into research on dementia or Alzheimer’s disease that is qualitative or quantitative the results of the study should be concise, clear and matching the method implemented. Any incongruences or limitations of the research must be disclosed. In quantitative research it is imperative that control be implemented. Control is the process of eliminating the impact of all variables that could skew the conclusion of the study.

In the memory care setting, as in all healthcare settings, using research findings can be challenging for both investigators and practitioners. This process can go much more smoothly when practitioners and investigators work together.

We are committed to evidence-based care at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living (as well as at our sister sites, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living and Bay View Assisted Living) and being familiar with relevant research is an important part of the care we provide. Stay tuned for the following parts of this series where we will explore milestones in the research of Alzheimer’s, dementia and Louis body dementia, evaluate the quality of research studies, and how to apply findings to everyday life and practice.

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Part III: Alzheimer’s and Dementia Research in San Diego https://harborviewsandiego.com/san-diego-senior-assisted-living/ https://harborviewsandiego.com/san-diego-senior-assisted-living/#respond Sun, 17 Jan 2021 04:05:28 +0000 http://harborviewsandiego.com/?p=3523 Evidence-based care is a huge priority for us at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living (as well as at our sister sites, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living and Bay View Assisted Living) and we hope you will appreciate diving into the research with us!

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Thanks for joining us for part three of our series on dementia and Alzheimer’s research! If you or a loved one was recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, dementia, or Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), you are probably experiencing a wide range of emotions. This is very normal and coming to a place of acceptance with a memory related diagnosis is always a difficult journey. Further along in the journey you might find yourself wanting to look into studies and relevant research to better understand this family of diseases. In this series, we will review some of the milestone studies related to Alzheimer’s disease, discuss types of research methods, discuss elements of research, and look into the application of methods to quantitative approaches. We will also explore how to evaluate research and identify the signs of a high quality study. Evidence-based care is a huge priority for us at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living (as well as at our sister sites, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living and Bay View Assisted Living) and we hope you will appreciate diving into the research with us! 

In part three of this series on research related to dementia and Alzheimer’s, we will continue to explore the elements of research. We will describe the following elements of research: the results and discussion, the method and the analysis. We will also begin to explore data analysis.

The method refers to the actual way in which the study is carried out. It includes the setting, the sample, data collection and data analysis. The setting is the location in which the study is being carried out. For example, a study could be conducted at a particular assisted living community in Point Loma. Sampling refers to selecting the group from a population that will be studied. Probability and non-probability sampling are the two main types of sampling. Probability sampling only occurs in quantitative studies and is implemented when researchers want to generalize results from a particular sample to a wider population. This is done by randomly choosing a group of subjects from the population. In non-probability sampling the choice of participants for the research is not random. There are various methods for selecting the subjects. One type of non-probability sampling is network or snowball sampling, which refers to a sampling method in which researchers asked participants to identify others who are similar to themselves who might become study subjects. In the Alzheimer’s disease context, this could mean that participants diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease would identify others in their support networks who could also potentially become test subjects.

In Alzheimer’s or memory care research, as in all research studies, there are various methods of collecting data. Data might be collected by observing, asking questions, or by measuring the main variables described in the research question or problem. Interviews gather more in-depth data then self-report questionnaires, however, interviewers take more time and resources to utilize. For example, a skilled interviewer could help to understand the quality of life of someone in an elder care community in San Diego perhaps better than a self-report questionnaire would.

Data analysis refers to the steps of examining, summarizing and bringing together the information gathered to decide if the study findings relate to the research question. In the qualitative approach data analysis continues throughout the entire study. For example, in a study of individuals with dementia, it would be important that the participant interviews continued to validate the researchers interpretation. It’s important that the findings of qualitative research are trustworthy. Some criteria for testing trustworthiness includes transfer ability, firm ability, dependability and credibility. In a memory care setting, researchers would attain credibility by collecting data for a long enough time to make sure that the holistic factors of subjects’ experiences were captured. In the application of methods to quantitative research, it is generally recommended to recruit as wide a sample as possible and then narrow the sample down.

In a quantitative approach it would not be enough to simply study one independent living community in Point Loma, The sample size would need to be much larger than that to be able to make generalizations about the entire population of those living with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.

We are committed to evidence-based care at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living (as well as at our sister sites, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living and Bay View Assisted Living) and being familiar with relevant research is an important part of the care we provide. Stay tuned for the following parts of this series where we will explore milestones in the research of Alzheimer’s disease, look into the application of methods to quantitative approaches and learn how to evaluate the quality of research studies.

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Part II: Alzheimer’s and Dementia Research https://harborviewsandiego.com/san-diego-memory-care-alzheimers-dementia-research/ https://harborviewsandiego.com/san-diego-memory-care-alzheimers-dementia-research/#respond Mon, 16 Nov 2020 20:25:03 +0000 http://harborviewsandiego.com/?p=3420 Thanks for joining us for part two of our series on dementia and Alzheimer’s research! We prioritize staying up to date on cutting edge Alzheimer's research at our senior assisted living community in San Diego.

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Thanks for joining us for part two of our series on dementia and Alzheimer’s research! If you or a loved one was recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, dementia, or Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), you are probably experiencing a wide range of emotions. This is very normal and coming to a place of acceptance with a memory related diagnosis is always a difficult journey. Further along in the journey you might find yourself wanting to look into studies and relevant research to better understand this family of diseases. In this series, we will review some of the milestone studies related to Alzheimer’s disease, discuss types of research methods, discuss elements of research, and look into the application of methods to quantitative approaches. We will also explore how to evaluate research and identify the signs of a high quality study. Evidence-based care is a huge priority for us at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living (as well as at our sister sites, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living and Bay View Assisted Living) and we hope you will appreciate diving into the research with us! 

In part two of this series on available research related to dementia and Alzheimer’s, we will explore the elements of research. The most important components of research include the results and discussion, the research purpose and problem, reviewing the literature, protecting human subjects, variables, the method, and the analysis.

The research purpose explains why the study is being done. The research problem describes what is being studied as well as the population involved in the study. Research problems should be meaningful to the population being studied. An example of a research problem stated in the form of a question is: “what factors influence individuals to seek care when they suspect they might be suffering from alzheimer’s disease?”

A variable is defined as a factor that varies or takes on different values. In a research context, variables must be measurable and, in certain types of studies, must be able to be manipulated. The independent variable is the factor that is hypothesized to affect the dependent variable. The dependent or outcome variable is what a researcher is wanting to explain or understand further. For example, a study could look at the impact of family visits on quality of life of persons living with dementia in an assisted living or independent living community. In this example, family visits would be the independent variable and quality of life of those living in an elder care community would be the dependent or outcome variable. Extraneous, confounding, or uncontrolled variables are factors specifically in quantitative studies that can have an impact on the dependent variable. Operational definitions are clear explanations of how the primary variables will be seen and measured. For example, if two different memory care communities are being compared, it is important to have a clear and consistent definition for what makes a facility a memory care community.

Literature review helps form a knowledge base for what is already known about a specific topic. The goal of qualitative methods is to unearth a new perspective about a phenomenon, therefore, literature should not influence researchers undergoing a qualitative study. On the other hand, for quantitative studies, the existing literature will assist researchers in boiling down the research problem and identifying gaps in current knowledge. For example, after reviewing literature on Alzheimer’s disease or dementia investigators may discover a knowledge gap in alternative treatment options in memory care settings. Researchers then might develop and conduct a study exploring alternative treatment options for memory related diseases.

Whenever research involves human subjects, it is very important that that research be conducted ethically and that the rights of study participants be protected. The Belmont report highlighted three overarching principles for research that is ethical: beneficence, the right to full disclosure, and the right to fair treatment. In a memory care context, this might look like all study participants being fully informed and consenting to taking a particular medication that is being studied.

We are committed to evidence-based care at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living (as well as at our sister sites, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living and Bay View Assisted Living) and being familiar with relevant research is an important part of the care we provide. Stay tuned for the following parts of this series where we will explore milestones in the research of Alzheimer’s disease, continue to explore the elements of research, look into the application of methods to quantitative approaches and learn how to evaluate the quality of research studies.

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Part I: Alzheimer’s and Dementia Research https://harborviewsandiego.com/alzheimersdementiaresearchsandiegoseniorliving/ https://harborviewsandiego.com/alzheimersdementiaresearchsandiegoseniorliving/#respond Fri, 23 Oct 2020 22:31:21 +0000 http://harborviewsandiego.com/?p=3371 Coming to a place of acceptance with a memory related diagnosis is always a difficult journey. We are honored to walk alongside families on this challenging path at our memory care communities in San Diego.

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If you or a loved one was recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, dementia, or Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), you are probably experiencing a wide range of emotions. This is very normal and coming to a place of acceptance with a memory related diagnosis is always a difficult journey. Further along in the journey you might find yourself wanting to look into studies and relevant research to better understand this family of diseases. In this series, we will review some of the milestone studies related to Alzheimer’s disease, discuss types of research methods, discuss elements of research, and look into the application of methods to quantitative approaches. We will also explore how to evaluate research and identify the signs of a high quality study. Evidence-based care is a huge priority for us at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living (as well as at our sister sites, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living and Bay View Assisted Living) and we hope you will appreciate diving into the research with us! 

In the first part of this series, we will explore the two main types of research: qualitative studies and quantitative studies. There is an increasing trend to use both qualitative and quantitative methods in the same study.

There are two primary types of research methods: quantitative methods and qualitative methods. Both qualitative and quantitative research methods are pertinent to the topic of memory care. Quantitative methods utilize the traditional scientific method. The traditional scientific method consists of pathways for controlling, collecting, analyzing and interpreting data about a specific topic. Qualitative methods are a little less cut and dry and are more broadly focused on generating new insights at the same time as collecting and analyzing information.

In quantitative research, the focus is on being objective and on measuring and controlling the experiment. For example, a quantitative research study could be a randomized controlled trial exploring the efficacy of a particular medication in a memory care patient population.

Nonexperimental studies and experimental studies are the two major types of quantitative research. Within these categories, there are three main types of quantitative research: descriptive studies, correlational studies, and experimental studies. Descriptive studies are utilized when the information about a specific topic is lacking. Results may explore an identified phenomenon and the connections between the variables of that situation. Correlational or association studies look at the connections between two or more variables and how strongly those connections might be related. An example of a correlational or association study could be exploring a particular type of dementia medication and the outcomes of the patients taking that medication. Experimental studies explore cause and affect to understand if a hypothesized correlation between variables is actually accurate. It is vital for the accuracy of experimental studies to have strict control of variables.

In qualitative research, the focus is on the full-orbed, holistic human experience. This type of research is limited to a specific context. For example, a qualitative research study could explore the holistic experience of Alzheimer’s patients being cared for at the Harbor View Senior Assisted Living community in Banker’s Hill.

There are four main qualitative methods of research: phenomenology, ethnography, grounded theory, and discourse analysis. The objective of phenomenology is to glean the meaning of daily experiences from the perspective of people who are living through those experiences. The goal of ethnography is to explain the practices, behavioral patterns and beliefs systems from the perspective of an individual from a particular culture or subculture. The grounded theory research method is used to come up with theories that enable practitioners to understand a particular psychological or social phenomenon. Discourse analysis explores language and communication in an attempt to understand the experiences or practices underlying participants’ lives. An example of this type of research in an elder care or memory care context could be studying how families of an independent living space resident respond differently to the term “BayView Senior Assisted Living Facility” as opposed to the term “BayView Senior Assisted Living Community.”

We are committed to evidence-based care at Harbor View Senior Assisted Living (as well as at our sister sites, Mesa View Senior Assisted Living and Bay View Assisted Living) and being familiar with relevant research is an important part of the care we provide. Stay tuned for the following parts of this series where we will explore milestones in the research of Alzheimer’s disease, elements of research, look into the application of methods to quantitative approaches, and learn how to evaluate the quality of research studies. 

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Understanding Assisted Living https://harborviewsandiego.com/understanding-assisted-living/ https://harborviewsandiego.com/understanding-assisted-living/#respond Fri, 14 Aug 2020 00:08:33 +0000 http://harborviewsandiego.com/?p=3278 What was a relatively new concept 25 years ago, assisted living is now the fastest growing long-term care option for seniors. Assisted living facilities, with their wide range of services, provide a senior housing solution for adults who can live […]

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What was a relatively new concept 25 years ago, assisted living is now the fastest growing long-term care option for seniors. Assisted living facilities, with their wide range of services, provide a senior housing solution for adults who can live independently, but also require some assistance.  Assisted living provides a level of care for seniors so they can continue to enjoy their lives even while struggling with Alzheimer’s or dementia.  Assisted living homes now have more options than ever before as far as care, food, and activities.  

The cost of an assisted living home varies, depending on the type of home it is.  The cost depends on the type of residence, the size of the rooms, the types of services needed, and the location of the home.  Many homes offer a month-to-month rate for basic services, and then charge extra fees for special services.  Some homes may offer a more long-term care payment option.  

All assisted living homes and communities are different.  Different states and countries have different licensing laws and regulations, so what you see somewhere may be very different than what you see somewhere else.  Some homes are connected to medical buildings, so they can provide more advanced medical care, but most assisted living homes provide basic daily care and monitoring.  This daily care and monitoring usually includes some or all of the following:

  • 24 hour supervision and security
  • Trained nurses and caregivers
  • 3 daily meals plus snacks
  • Basic housekeeping and laundry
  • Health and fitness programs
  • Social, creative, or spiritual programs 
  • Transportation
  • Access to medical services
  • Bathing and dressing
  • Medication reminders and management

Many assisted living homes are specialized for those with Alzheimer’s or dementia.  These homes require a higher level of care for its residents.  Some of the extra services that these homes provide are: day care, long-term care, palliative care, respite, short-term care, and hospice.  They may also offer rooms where the partner of a loved one can stay with the resident in the assisted living home.  

Every assisted living home or community has its own “personality”.  Some communities are more formal and traditional, whereas others are more home-like with a down-to-earth ambiance.  The design style of homes will differ – one may be mid-century modern, while another looks like a country living home.  Some communities are in the middle of sprawling urban cities, some are situated in the suburbs, and some may be out in the farm lands, hills everywhere in sight.  

Some assisted living homes allow pets, and some allow your partner to live with you, even if they don’t need care themselves.  Some homes are more “nursing care” for people with greater needs, and some are mainly independent homes with care for basic tasks.  You can search out assisted living communities that are ethnically and culturally diverse.  

So now that we know that assisted living homes can look so different from each other, here are some things to consider when you are choosing a home for yourself or a loved one:

  1. What is your personality like?  Do you like the buzz of a big city or do you like to be out in nature?  Do you like your surroundings to be homey and cozy, or do you prefer up-to-date style and clean decorating lines?
  2. How far is the home from loved ones who will want to visit?  Is it close enough for frequent visits and guests?
  3. Is the staff professional and well-trained?  Are they friendly, kind, safe, and good at their jobs?
  4. Is the food appealing to you?  Is it healthy?  Do they offer snacks throughout the day in between meals?
  5. Are the rooms clean and well taken care of?  

Obviously there are many more questions to ask, but that is a good starting point when trying to narrow down your choices.  Making the decision for where you will live is a big one, so it’s important to be knowledgeable about what’s out there. 

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